March 2016

DIY Workshop Collaboration-3

If you missed out on the last vendor social we collaborated on with District Bliss, have no fear!  We’re creating the giveaways for their next fabulous DIY workshop on April 10 – Makeup Tips and Tricks with Ariel Lewis! Super excited to contribute, along with Popcorn Queens and Ariel Lewis. I gave away some gifts from Popcorn Queens for the holidays and they were a big hit.

Make sure to get your spot now, because they are sure to go fast.

Sign Up Here

Word

You know the drill. It never fails. You’ll find a great client, design a beautiful flyer or brochure, and things will be going great, when the dreaded question arises.  The question that strikes fear in the heart of designs everywhere.

“This looks great,” they say. “Can I get this in WORD?”

Now the above is meant to be comical, but seriously, why don’t designers design in Word? Let’s talk about this.

When you go to a designer looking for a page layout, they will likely be working for you in InDesign or Illustrator. This is not to keep you from being able to edit the files yourself. This is not to make sure you come back every time you need an update. This is simply to give you the best, professional looking design possible.

Side note:  If you hire someone and they say they design everything exclusively in Word, I would run – and run fast…

InDesign and Illustrator are created for desktop publishing and graphic design. They have the ultimate amount of flexibility when it comes to layout and placement. You can have photos, text boxes with two (or three or four) columns and text boxes with one column, all on one page AND be assured that the placement never changes.

When a document is created in these programs, the designer saves a working file to make changes, but unless you are a designer or have a designer on staff, they likely provide you with a pdf.  Delivery in a pdf means:

You don’t have to worry about whether or not you have the font.

You don’t have to worry about hitting a button and accidentally changing the layout.

You don’t have to worry about what version of Word you have versus what the designer has (versus what the viewer has).

You are assured that your final product is of the highest quality, and ready to be printed or emailed, depending on the agreement.

And then, the inevitable.

What about letterhead?

Letterhead is one of the exceptions. With so much correspondence happening via email, it makes sense to provide a client with a letterhead in Word. But this rarely necessitates any sort of extravagant layout. The header and footer of a design, done in InDesign, Illustrator or Photoshop, is placed in the header/footer of the word document. In this case, we are using Word as it is meant to be used – as a word processing tool. All other design is happening outside the program.

All that said – I don’t hate Word. I use it for papers, letters, notes…  I think it is a great tool for writing, and its many templates have went a long way to put design in the hands of non-designers.  I just don’t use it to design.

At the end of the day, what I can provide a client in InDesign or Illustrator will far surpass what I can provide a client in Word – and if you are hiring me, you deserve the best I can deliver.