Tag: freelance

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On September 15th I went down to iStrategyLabs to check out ContraryCon with some of my favorite freelancers in Freelance DC.  ContraryCon advertises itself as the “anti-conference” for people who “upset, astound and evolve” the creative industry in DC. I am happy to share my favorite quotes and insights from a few of the speakers.

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José Andrés

José Andrés is Chef/Owner of ThinkFoodGroup.  He talked about what it means to be disruptive.

“To be disruptive you have to get to people.” – you can’t be disruptive if no one knows about you.  You have to stop talking and start moving forward.  While it may seem fantastic, “Reach for the impossible and anywhere you fall in between will still be good for people.”

One of the inspiring things that he said was that, “Sometimes the people that seem like followers are actually leaders.” You may not feel or look like a leader in the conventional sense, but you may still be implementing big change. “At times it’s going to be unclear who is a leader and who is a follower and that’s ok – we need everybody.”

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Christian Dutilh & Jacob Weinzettel

Christian and Jacob are co-owners of Composite Co, a multidisciplinary creative studio for branding. They spoke to use about being different.

“We are all born different. Later in life it takes an active effort to take pride in the fact that we are different.”

They talked about establishing their company, and repositioning.  Essentially, “repositioning yourself is about tapping into something unique and authentic and bringing that out. Be the thing. Don’t be afraid to call yourself what you are.”

In a design process, “Good taste isn’t enough – you have to have concept and rationale behind it.  Research, research, research – but then do your own thing.” They spoke about how we get bogged down in research, and often try to recreate what we see – but in reality, we should use the research to inform, and still use our intuition to guide us on the design journey.

They reminded us that “Creativity is something you can learn and hone and it doesn’t happen for no reason.” You have to practice creativity, the same way you practice every skill.  The more you use it, the more you will have…

Kalsoom Lakhani

Kalssom Lakhani is Founder/CEO of Invest2Innovate. She talked to us about being vulnerable and honest as entrepreneurs.

“By not saying [doubt/fears] out loud I am stoking people’s feelings of inadequacy.” She questioned why we all put on a facade, and reminded us that by hiding our struggles, we make people believe that the struggle doesn’t exist for us, and shouldn’t exist for them.  “It’s ok to be afraid of failing.” We all are.

She also reminded us that we need to take care of ourselves first. “You can’t be in service to others if you’re not first in service to yourself.” If you sacrifice your own health and wear yourself down, you can’t be helpful to other people.

In the end, “Success is a process and not an end goal.” Our businesses are forever changing and evolving. We have to celebrate all the victories, as they are today’s success.

All in all, ContraryCon introduced me to people doing really amazing work in DC. Definitely well worth the $20 price point.  I’d recommend it, and I’ll see you there next year!

07.25.2017

Sometimes, I reflect on how lucky I am to be able to do what I love to do – and do it on my own terms. The road to owning my own business didn’t happen overnight.  There is no perfect formula, but to those starting out and looking for your first clients, here is what I would say:

Meet people.  Lots of people.

When I first picked up freelance projects, I was actually looking for a job. I was meeting anyone and everyone to try to get a foot in the door. This brought me a few of my very first clients, but it also taught me an important lesson – you never know who you will meet and how you may be able to help each other. Maybe someone doesn’t have work for you right away – that’s fine – it is still worth taking the time to connect with them.

Don’t be discouraged. There are GOOD PEOPLE out there.

Sometimes, it will feel like people are trying to dull your sparkle. Realize it isn’t always about you. Keep your head up and seek out the people who are good. Let them inspire you and hold on to them as clients and/or colleagues. The good people far outweigh the bad in the long run.

And in that vein…

Do right by people.

In the same way you want clients and connections to do right by you, you should do the same. People will remember it, and respond in kind.

Do your best work.

It may seem obvious, but always strive to do your best work, regardless of the client or the budget. In a lot of ways, the work will speak for itself, and if clients are happy, they will come back or refer other clients to you. A small budget project may lead to a huge contract later.  You just never know.

Utilize social media.

I have met a few wonderful clients on social media. It is a great and inexpensive way to show people who you are, and to get your name out there. Have conversations, share tips, interact…  It will help keep you top of mind when that project DOES materialize.

What do you wish you had known when you first started your business?

 

There are many reasons it rocks to work with freelancers – and now we give you one more…  When everyone else takes a snow day, our commute to the next room means we’re there for you when you need us!  Be safe, DC!  We’ll be here to help you with your design emergencies no matter the weather.

Ready?

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Let’s get personal for a minute. It has been almost a year since I took the plunge into full-time freelance, and the year has been a ride. Here are 5 things I’ve learned as I took the leap into self-employment.

1. You will work harder than ever before.

As a freelancer, you get a lot of freedom. Want to wake up at 9am?  Do it. Want to go to the store in the middle of the day? Done. But like they say on Once Upon a Time – “Magic comes with a price.” In freelancing, that price is that only you can get the work done. Sick days? Days off? They only sort of exist, because if you are on a deadline, there is no one there to pick up the slack for you. You will work harder than ever before. But…that brings us to number 2.

2. It will be more rewarding than ever before too.

I work harder than ever before, but because the work is mine, I want to. I love my clients, and I love the feeling of satisfaction finishing up that job that I’ve been striving toward for ages. I do a bigger range of work now, and I find that extremely rewarding. Instead of an employee, I am a partner – helping people achieve their business goals. That is an incredible responsibility, but it also comes with a lot of satisfaction.

3. There will be quiet times. This is ok.

I am still working on this one. There are times when all your projects are out for review, and the work is…well, done.  You sit down, and you stare at your inbox, and you wonder what the next email will be. It is scary – but it is ok. I consider these days “forced days off” – days to recharge my batteries and work on the projects that keep my business running, like updating my website, writing blog posts, etc. And tomorrow, either I will find work or work will find me.

4. Everyone will say, “It must be so nice. You can turn down work you don’t want.” 

One of the first things I hear when I tell people I freelance is – “I wish I had the courage to do that.” The next is “It must be so nice to turn down the projects you don’t want.” While this is nice in theory, it isn’t the reality, at least not for someone building their business. I want to get my name out there – I am hungry for projects. And while I won’t devalue my work or take less money than I deserve, I will rarely turn down a project because I “don’t want it.”

5. You are not alone.

Sometimes, freelancing is isolating. Not everyone understands how it works. People will think you are between jobs. People will think you are taking this monumental risk. Maybe you are. But there are many, many other people out there like you, who are waking up every day and setting their own schedules, and they are hungry to connect. Freelance DC has been a huge resource for me this year. I’ve found clients, and I’ve found friends. Find your group – they are looking for you too.

Here’s to another year of learning, growth and partnerships with great clients and friends.